New Handbook Explains How to Exploit Salmon and Rivers In Harmony (and Still Grow Powerful)

by Rabbit / Earth First! Newswire

“As far as salmon rivers are concerned, the handbook says the first task is to identify current problems that limit salmon production in rivers.” Hey, what if the problems are the murderous river-choking dams y'all built?

“As far as salmon rivers are concerned, the handbook says the first task is to identify current problems that limit salmon production in rivers.” Hey, what if the problems are the murderous river-choking dams y’all built? [photo: Glenn Fleishman]

As always, exploitative industries wanna look good, and wearing green is still in style. Lucky for those in the hydropower industry, Climate News Network reported today that “Norwegian scientists have produced a handbook to assist river engineers and to explain how to protect vulnerable species while exploiting rivers for renewable energy.”

Though it uses terms that suggest creating a balance, an impossible yin and yang of technology and nature, this new handbook and the methods described within are quite obviously concerned with mass production, not sustainability or healthy ecosystems.

In the midst of an unprecedented salmon die-off on the North American continent, Climate News Network begins their uplifting article by implying that the problem the salmon face is actually a lack of production:

“Hydropower can dramatically alter rivers and destroy the habitat of migratory species such as salmon, but now scientists have shown that it is perfectly possible for rivers to produce more fish and more electricity at the same time.” Note that their statement doesn’t end with, “without dramatically altering rivers and destroying habitats.” In fact, majorly altering rivers is a staple of the plan for these new, shall we call them “green,” hydropower dams.

Of course, like all successful capitalists, it’s only their salmon in their river that matter—all the other rivers can pick themselves up by their bootstraps:

“Looking at the existing or potential hydropower, engineers need to work out operating strategies for the power stations to avoid interfering with the salmon. These could include ideas such as transferring water from neighbouring rivers to improve flow at critical times…” Also, “Forseth added that while transfer of water from neighbouring rivers can be costly, it is another possible option to ensure that hydropower companies and salmon have more water to share.” Sharing. That’s nice.

But hey, at least they’re honest. “It won’t be possible everywhere, and in some rivers we have still to choose between salmon and power.”

In these cases, what will the industries choose? Salmon… or POWER?!?!?!?!!!!

Tags: , ,